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Collaboration Between Secant Group and Nationwide Children’s Hospital Advances Ground-breaking Cardiovascular Technology

Collaboration Between Secant Group and Nationwide Children's Hospital Advances Ground-breaking Cardiovasc

Secant Group, a leading implantable biomaterials developer based in suburban Philadelphia, PA, and a subsidiary of Solesis , has signed an agreement with The Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, OH, to explore potential solutions for repairing congenital heart defects in children.

The Secant Group and Nationwide Children’s collaboration advances the development of implantable tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to treat conditions such as coronary artery defects in children. The novel TEVGs at the center of Nationwide Children’s research have the potential to restore compromised vascular tissue into fully functioning vessels that naturally grow as children develop, potentially eliminating the need for multiple risky procedures throughout the patient’s life.

The technology supporting the Secant Group-Nationwide Children’s collaboration is Secant’s novel biopolymer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a “stealth” material that does not overstimulate the body’s immune system. PGS is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and tunable elastomer that enables TEVGs to regenerate and restore healthy, compliant tissue.

“As the contract developer and manufacturer of the TEVG implant, Secant Group is supporting the advancement of Nationwide Children’s research to develop a potential solution for repairing heart defects. This is exactly the kind of unmet healthcare need that Secant Group set out to support with our polymer and textile expertise more than a decade ago,” says Jeremy Harris, PhD, Senior Director of Research at Secant, who is responsible for innovating Solesis’ core technologies in biomaterials and textile engineering.

“Research like this is vital in order to advance the care and treatment of children born with congenital cardiac anomalies,” said Christopher K. Breuer, MD, director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “We look forward to continuing this important work to take more steps forward toward best outcomes for this patient population.”

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